National Security meeting on Vietnam in the Cabinet Room, White House, Washington, DC.
Part 1
Part 1
Part 2
Part 2
Part 3
Part 3
Part 4
Part 4

Audio Note: Audio from tape 3 cuts off a few paragraphs short, but the transcript is complete.

Image:  National Security meeting on Vietnam in the Cabinet Room, White House, Washington, DC.  Carl Rowan speaks as John McNaughton (in soft focus, foreground left) and Chester Cooper (partially obscured by chair, in background) listen.  United States Federal Government, public domain.  LBJ Presidential Library Online Photo Archive.

Audio courtesty of the University of Kentucky.

Carl T. Rowan

Date: 
May 14, 1964
Related Documents: 
Carl T. Rowan
Topics: 
Africa
Carl T. Rowan Bio

 

Carl T. Rowan (1925-2000) was a journalist, author, and television commentator. He was a staff writer at the Minneapolis Tribune in the 1950s and wrote extensively about the civil rights movement. He wrote a syndicated column for the Chicago Sun-Times from 1966 to 1998, and was a Pulitzer Prize finalist in 1995 for his commentary. Rowan also was a commissioned officer in the Navy during World War II, was appointed Deputy Secretary of State by John F. Kennedy, and served as ambassador to Finland in 1963. In 1964-1965 he served as Director of the United States Information Agency. Rowan was the first African American to attend meetings of the National Security Council.  He was awarded a lifetime achievement award by the National Press Club in 1999, and in 2001 Secretary of State Madeleine Albright dedicated the State Department’s press briefing room as the Carl T. Rowan Briefing room. 

Abstract

Rowan discusses various aspects of the civil rights movement. Rowan believes that the traditional black leadership organizations are not dead, and that there is a need for associations that will look out for the legal aspects of the civil rights movement. Rowan discusses the difficulty in making a distinction between the civil rights movement in the North and in the South. He describes the feeling of regional persecution throughout the South due to the prejudices of the northern states. Rowan provides his views of Lincoln and Jefferson, and he concludes with a discussion about the political power African Americans have.

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